Indian School Of Business


This 70 acre site is located near the City of Chandigarh and was part of area agricultural fields - a dominating landscape within the region. The regional landscape design's core principle was to integrate this historic agricultural use of land with the new use and develop a strong connection to the larger community.

The macro site specific landscape design objectives were to facilitate high level of pedestrian connectivity and create a pedestrian oriented campus that facilitated a strong sense of community within the campus. At the micro level the objective was to take advantage of the building and site orientation and respond to climatic conditions. We created gardens along the main academic block, which are used depending on the seasons. Extending the S-W axis connected the Academic block to Commons and Executive Education block into the landscape and used them as either formal gardens in form of ceremonial lawns in front of Academic block or informal dinner terrace within the commons. The NS axis of Academic block was extended in to staff housing on North side by creating series of linear garden and transitions were created by stepping courtyards.

Housing was developed around the central theme of rain water harvesting and storm water management system. A central 'pond' was created as main feature which could act as a natural reserve with nestled activates for recreation, nature trails or community seating. Series of meandering swales were created emerging from the 'pond' through the Students housing which could also be used as informal recreational spaces. Faculty housing is also designed around linear rain water gardens laid on more formal manner with large open spaces for formal recreation spaces.


PROJECT AREA
70 Acres

PROJECT SCOPE
Landscape Master Plan and Schematic Landscape Design

PROJECT STATUS
Design Development Phase

CLIENT
ISB

ARCHITECTS
Perkins Eastman, International, New York


This 70 acre site is located near the City of Chandigarh and was part of area agricultural fields - a dominating landscape within the region. The regional landscape design's core principle was to integrate this historic agricultural use of land with the new use and develop a strong connection to the larger community.

The macro site specific landscape design objectives were to facilitate high level of pedestrian connectivity and create a pedestrian oriented campus that facilitated a strong sense of community within the campus. At the micro level the objective was to take advantage of the building and site orientation and respond to climatic conditions. We created gardens along the main academic block, which are used depending on the seasons. Extending the S-W axis connected the Academic block to Commons and Executive Education block into the landscape and used them as either formal gardens in form of ceremonial lawns in front of Academic block or informal dinner terrace within the commons. The NS axis of Academic block was extended in to staff housing on North side by creating series of linear garden and transitions were created by stepping courtyards.

Housing was developed around the central theme of rain water harvesting and storm water management system. A central 'pond' was created as main feature which could act as a natural reserve with nestled activates for recreation, nature trails or community seating. Series of meandering swales were created emerging from the 'pond' through the Students housing which could also be used as informal recreational spaces. Faculty housing is also designed around linear rain water gardens laid on more formal manner with large open spaces for formal recreation spaces.